Washington Redskins football shirts and a team flag at a sporting goods store in Bailey’s Crossroads, Virginia, U.S., June 24, 2020. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque/File Photo

THE NEUTRAL ZONE

The National Football League team the Washington Redskins has always been a topic of discussion for their name having racial connotation to it. This time, however, is different. Investors called out the NFL team sponsors to cut ties with the organization. Companies such as Nike, FedEx, and PepsiCo have received petition letters from investors urging the companies to break the partnership. This has come in the height of the George Floyd and Black Lives Matter protest. Native Americans have urged the team to change its name for some time now as the name is considered a racial slur against Native Americans.

On top of this conflict Dan Snyder, owner of the Redskins, stated he wanted to move his team due to the aging stadium they are currently playing in. Snyder wants to move the team to the RFK multi-purpose field in Washington D.C. The RFK land is federally owned and if the team decides to move they have to change the name.

Back in 2013, Snyder was quoted saying he will “never change the name.” Along with Snyder, the head coach for the Redskins, Ron Rivera, stated: “I’m just somebody that’s from a different era when football wasn’t such a big part of the political scene.” Snyder has yet to comment on the current situation and whether or not he is considering the name change for the sake of moving the team.

MEDIA PERSPECTIVE

Redskins cannot move to new stadium unless team name changes: report – Fox News – 7/2/2020 The team is looking to move to a new stadium in the near future, but their relocation from Maryland to the RFK Stadium in D.C. now hinges on the organization’s willingness to change its name, The Washington Post reported on Wednesday.

Unless Daniel Snyder changes Redskins’ name, RFK site is off the table, officials say – Washington Post – 7/1/2020 There is no scenario in which Daniel Snyder will be able to build a new Washington Redskins stadium on the federally owned RFK Stadium site unless he changes the team’s name.

Politicians Say No to Redskins & RFK – Sports Illustrated – 7/2/2020 In news that should surprise absolutely nobody – politicians that represent Washington D.C. and another that is the chair of the House Natural Resources Committee told Liz Clarke of the Washington Post on Wednesday that the Redskins are not welcome in the nation’s capital. 

Major Investors Demand Brands Break Partnerships If Redskins Name Doesn’t Change – ClutchPoints – 7/1/2020 A group consisting of 87 investment firms and shareholders reportedly wrote a letter to Nike, FedEx and PepsiCo, asking all three companies to terminate their partnerships with the team if the name is not changed (via Mary Emily O’Hara of AdWeek)

INFLUENCER PERSPECTIVE

  • Mary Emily O’Hara on Twitter 07/01/2020: BREAKING: Investors and shareholders worth a collective $620 billion sent letters to @Nike @FedEx and @PepsiCo asking the brands to divest from the Washington @Redskins unless the team agrees to change its name.
  • Alyssa Milano on Twitter 07/01/2020: We must end racism in its entirety. Allowing the @nfl to continue to use the @redskins name is destructive to Native communities and cannot be tolerated any longer. Change the name @Redskins @nfl #TheTimeIsNow #ChangeTheName
  • NBC Sports Redskins on Twitter 07/01/2020: Report: Investment firms and shareholders worth a collective $620 billion have asked Nike, FedEx and PepsiCo to end their relationships with the Redskins unless the team changes its name.
  • Axios on Twitter 07/02/2020: The national dialogue about racism has renewed calls for the Washington Redskins to change their name — and now protesters are targeting their sponsors.

There's depth. And then there's in-depth.

To get beyond the news and receive actionable intelligence about this topic or thousands more, simply enter your email address below.

You May Also Like

Eviction crisis looms closer with high unemployment, end of coronavirus protections

One in five U.S. households could face eviction by this fall, advocates warn